Four Mistakes Made In Law School Applications

Interested in Law School? Ask Yourself These Questions.

Law school is a big investment.

The average annual tuition and fees cost for private law schools was $49,548 in the 2019-2020 academic year, according to US News. The average law school debt is around $145,500, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics.

With costs being so high, it’s important for prospective law school applicants to do some self-reflection and understand whether law school will really benefit them.

The experts at Stratus Admissions recently outlined a few important questions applicants should ask themselves when applying to law school.

DO I REALLY WANT TO BE A LAWYER?

First and foremost, applicants need to ask themselves what about the law career interests them.

“Try to talk to some lawyers in your life who are at different stages of their careers and who practice in different sectors (law firms, government, in-house, public interest),” according to Stratus. “Ask them what they love about practicing law and what they find challenging. Your university Career Services office can often connect you with alums who have become lawyers. You can also reach out to the local Bar Association in your area.”

WHERE CAN I REALISTICALLY GET IN?

If your numbers aren’t good enough, it may be smarter to wait and build experience before applying.

“I generally advise students to aim for an LSAT score and a GPA in the top 25 percent of students who were admitted in the prior year,” according to Stratus. “Students with grades and scores in this range have a solid chance of acceptance and even getting merit-based aid, as long as their essays are as strong as their academic record.”

HOW AM I GOING TO PAY?

As mentioned previously, law school cost is enormous. The good news, however, is that financial aid programs can substantially lower that cost.

“Pay attention to deadlines. FAFSA and other scholarship deadlines tend to be quite early in the application cycle,” according to Stratus. “Most schools offer merit-based scholarships for students with high GPAs and LSAT scores.”

Sources: Stratus Admissions, US News, National Center for Education Statistics

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