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Baylor Law School

Baylor Law School

Law Applicant Who Wanted His 1970s GPA Adjusted For Grade Inflation Is Denied

 
Have you ever been around a two-year-old? And the toddler wants something really badly and she doesn’t get it, so she throws an epic fit? Keep that image in mind. In 2012, then 54-year-old, Michael Kamps alleged Baylor University’s Law School of ageism in their admissions decision process. His specific complaint was that because of grade inflation, his undergraduate GPA from 1979 should not be used in the admissions decision. Baylor heeded Kamps complaint and then declined to admit him.
Kamps didn’t take that decision  lying down. He then alleged the school denied him admission and placed more weight on undergraduate GPA for their decisions regarding merit-based scholarships—all because of his initial report. You know how two-year-olds think everything in the world revolves around them and every decision made is based on them? Some people never grow out of the terrible twos.
So Kamps took Baylor to court. Specifically, the Fifth Circuit court in New Orleans. In 2014, the court ruled in favor of the defendants. Because, duh. “Most of Kamps’ claims are barred because he did not exhaust administrative remedies,” the Fifth Circuit opinion states. The opinion goes on to mention Kamps actually did receive admission into the school “on several occasions” after 2012. Kamps just didn’t get admitted when he wanted to be admitted. Or, he didn’t get what he wanted when he wanted it. So he threw his metaphorical tantrum in the form of a court case. Perhaps the most humorous part to the story is Kamps represented himself.
When he lost the case, he did what any self-respecting litigator would do. He appealed to the Supreme Court. This week, the Supreme Court ruled they would not see Kamps’ case. Shocker. “I wouldn’t have filed it if I didn’t think it raised an interesting question, but I guess this is the end of the road,” Kamps said.
After all of that, Kamps will not be attending law school anywhere. With the three-year tantrum laid to rest, perhaps Kamps has exhausted himself and he can move on.
Source: ABA Journal and Texas Lawyer
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