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The LSATs Accepted at 200 Law Schools

“There are three kinds of lies: Lies, damned lies, and statistics.”
Apparently, Mark Twain was familiar with law school admissions. Let’s face it: Getting in is often a numbers game.
Sure, applications are down. Despite hiking tuitions, deans are also trimming faculty, class sizes and support services. You can tout intangibles like experience, versatility, stamina, and hunger. Heck, you may even be a legacy. But there are only so many spots. In the end, it is all about one number: Your LSAT score.
When adcoms are reviewing an application, they’re asking one question: Is this person smart enough? In an age of grade inflation, not all undergraduate programs are considered equal. But the LSAT levels the playing field. It enables admissions people to rank candidates. While a compelling story and a strong track record can offset a pedestrian score, your LSAT will ultimately determine where you can go.
So, you have two choices. First, you can live in denial. You can shoot for the moon and get waitlisted. Or, you can identify the schools where you have the best shot at being accepted. Then, you can narrow down your choices based on location, specialties, placement rates, scholarships, support services, and (most important) your gut feeling after a visit. So forget about your sugarplum fantasies of Harvard or Stanford. Ten years after the bar, your employer, clients, and peers won’t remember where you graduated. They’ll only care about your abilities and reputation (and maybe your win-loss record too).
This week, Law School Admissions Counselor shares exactly what test-takers need to score to get into their preferred law schools. It does so using a chart outlining where the bottom 25%, average, and top 75% of students score on the LSAT for particular programs.
For example, let’s say you scored a 163. That would put you among the average scores of students entering Notre Dame, the University of Georgia, and Fordham. However, higher-ranked schools like Georgetown, Northwestern, and Texas also accept scores as low as 163. What’s more, a 163 would make you appealing to schools like Southern Methodist University and the University of California-Hastings, where you might rank among their top students (giving you a better shot at negotiating a favorable tuition package).
In short, you can use this method to research schools, pinpoint fallbacks, and determine if you need to re-take the LSAT. So where do you fit? Check out the chart below:

Group

School

Bottom 25%

Median

Top 75%

1

Harvard University

170

173

175

1

Yale University

170

173

176

2

Columbia University

169

171

173

2

Stanford University

169

171

173

3

Chicago, University of

166

170

172

3

New York University

168

170

172

4

Duke University

165

169

170

4

Pennsylvania, University of

165

169

171

4

Virginia, University of

164

169

170

5

Georgetown University

163

168

169

5

Michigan, University of

165

168

170

5

Northwestern University

161

168

171

6

California-Berkeley, University of

163

167

169

6

California-Los Angeles, University of

162

167

169

6

Cornell University

165

167

167

6

Vanderbilt University

163

167

169

7

Southern California, University of

163

166

167

7

Texas At Austin, University of

163

166

168

7

Washington University

160

166

167

8

Boston University

161

165

166

8

Emory University

157

165

166

8

George Washington University

159

165

167

9

Alabama, University of

157

164

166

9

Boston College

160

164

165

9

California-Irvine, University of

162

164

166

9

Minnesota, University of

156

164

167

9

Washington And Lee University

160

164

165

9

Washington, University of

161

164

165

9

William And Mary Law School

161

164

165

10

Fordham University

161

163

165

10

Georgia, University of

158

163

164

10

Notre Dame, University of

160

163

165

 
Source: Law School Admissions Counselor
To read the complete chart, which include LSATs for over 200 schools ranging from Brigham Young to Texas Southern, click on the source article below.
Source: Law School Admissions Counselor