Harvard Law Students Respond Positively To Virtual Fall Term

As summer comes to a close, many law schools have launched their fall term.

While plans for virtual or a hybrid model mix of online and in-person classes differ from school-to-school, one thing is for certain: this semester is different.

At Harvard Law, as The Harvard Crimson reports, Harvard Law students are reporting a positive online learning experience with kickoff of the fall term, an improvement over the virtual spring semester when schools around the nation were forced to transition online overnight.

“In some respects, I actually prefer online classes, since it relieves me of the burden of commuting to school and allows me to spend more time with my family,” third-year student Davis B. Campbell tells the Crimson.

ORIGINAL BACKLASH

Back in June, Harvard Law had announced its plans to hold the fall term online in response to the coronavirus pandemic – a decision that drew backlash from hundreds of students.

In a petition to the law school dean and university president, students called for a hybrid plan that would allow a mix of both online and in-person classes.

IMPROVEMENTS IN ONLINE LEARNING

Now, as the fall term continues online, students such as Campbell are reporting that while social events are difficult, the online learning environment has improved.

“Professors have done a good job adapting to Zoom, and the quality of class discussion is just as high as when we were in person,” Campbell tells the Crimson.

Other students report helpful online features and resources such as Zoom’s polling function.

“Overall, I think it’s clear that the professors have put in work to make sure that we are obtaining a rewarding learning experience despite it being online,” first-year student Daisy Almonte tells the Crimson. “I am definitely engaged in the material we are covering in all of my courses.”

If anything, students say, there’s been an increased importance in taking time to rest.

“Zoom fatigue is real, and it’s been taking a toll on my eyes,” Almonte tells the Crimson.

Sources: The Harvard Crimson, Harvard Law School, Law.com

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