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UCLA School of Law

This Law School Has The Most Openly LGBTQ Faculty

The law school with the most openly LGBTQ faculty members?

According to The Law School Climate Survey, conducted by the National LGBT Bar Association and Foundation, it’s the UCLA School of Law.

The association surveyed 67 ABA-accredited law schools to identify policies and procedures that impact the schools’ LGBTQ population.

Law schools answered “yes” or “no” to statements such as: “Seeks out prospective LGBTQ+ students,” “welcome packet includes mention of identity group support,” ”offers option to self-identify in admissions or post-enrollment forms,” “allows transgender name of choice,” “provides annual scholarships for LGBTQ+ students,” and more.

UCLA Law Leads

The UCLA School of Law reported that it has 14 openly LGBTQ faculty members, which accounts for the highest number of faculty members among surveyed schools.

Over the past 50 years, according to Brad Sears, the associate dean of public interest law at UCLA School of Law, the law school has made considerable advancements to support LGBTQ students.

“UCLA Law has made substantial investment in sexual orientation and gender identity law and policy with the founding of the Williams Institute in 2001, long before the majority of Americans supported LGBT rights,” he tells the Daily Bruin. “It (is) therefore not surprising that out-LGBTQ faculty and students continue to make UCLA law their academic home.”

At UCLA Law, the Dukeminier Awards Journal of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law publishes hundreds of law review articles regarding various aspects of sexual orientation and gender identity law.

The Williams Institute at UCLA Law also aims to conduct research on sexual orientation and gender identity law and public policy.

Not Enough Data

While UCLA Law reported the highest number of openly LGBTQ faculty members, it may be possible that a number of schools simply don’t collect data on faculty sexual orientation and gender identity.

“It’s possible that a good number of schools do have (a number of openly) gay faculty but are not asking and hence don’t know,” Judi O’Kelley, chief program officer for the National LGBT Bar Association and Foundation, tells the Daily Bruin.

Ultimately, O’Kelley says, the hope of the survey is that it will encourage law schools to provide greater support for LGBTQ professionals and encourage diversity.

Sources: Daily Bruin, National LGBT Bar Association and Foundation, Dukeminier Awards Journal of Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Law, Williams Institute