Applicant Faces Sentencing for Cyberstalking Georgetown Law Interviewer

Georgetown Law Center

Applicant Faces Sentencing for Cyberstalking Georgetown Law Interviewer

Not everyone takes the hint.

Ho Ka Terence Yung, a former University of Texas law student, was arrested February 2017 and is scheduled to be sentenced for one count of cyberstalking on February 27 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware, Law.com reports. He faces up to five years in prison.

“The defendant’s conduct offers a disturbing example of the destructive potential of the Internet and social media,” David Weiss, U.S. attorney for the District of Delaware, says in an announcement. “For 18 months the defendant pursued a sustained, sadistic course of conduct designed to terrorize his victim and the victim’s family—all because the defendant was denied admission to the law school of his choice.”

Dark Trail Of Online Harassment

In 2014, Yung applied to Georgetown Law and took part in an interview with a nearby Georgetown alum, who determined that Yung “performed poorly.” A week later, according to the justice department, Yung’s application was denied.

Over the course of 18 months following his rejection to Georgetown, Yung continuously posted “violent and sadistic” online statements about the Georgetown alum. One of those statements was a falsified story detailing the alum’s alleged abduction and raping of an 8-year-old girl.

In addition, Yung created a number of Craigslist ads calling for individuals interested in violent sex to go to the alum’s house in the middle of the night.

“Yung repeatedly published violent and sadistic statements about Victim 1 on the Internet – including descriptions of rape, lynching, sexual molestation, and graphic violence,” the Justice Department’s announcement describes.

Yung was eventually arrested after a months-long FBI investigation. He is currently detained and awaiting his sentencing.

“For 18 months the defendant pursued a sustained, sadistic course of conduct designed to terrorize his victim and the victim’s family—all because the defendant was denied admission to the law school of his choice,” Weiss states. “Our office continues to fight for victims who are tormented by those who seek to use the Internet and social media for such destructive purposes. The defendant must be held accountable for the damage he inflicted.”

Sources: Law.com, District of Delaware